The Eagle Symbol – Native Art Symbols and Meanings

Eagles are one of the most important clan and crest animals in Native American mythology, art and culture. The eagle is one of the main crests among First Nations, such as Haida, Tsimshian, Tlingit and Heiltsuk, who live along the Northwest coast of North America. This area also features the largest bald eagle population in Canada. Here they find large bodies of water ideal for fishing and large trees for nesting.

Eagles are a symbol of strength, authority and power. They rule the skies with grace and great intellect. In many cultures around the world, their wings are symbols of protection, but to Northwest coast peoples eagles are spiritual messengers who carry prayers to the Creator. They have the ability to fly higher than any other bird and benefit from their extraordinary vision.

Eagle feathers and down are sacred. They have healing powers, and are symbols of peace and friendship. During welcome dances and other ceremonial occasions, they are used to honour respected guests. In some cultures, eagle feathers are given as gifts to honour a person’s accomplishments and acts of courage.

In Northwest coast art, eagle designs are found on totem poles, ceremonial staffs, and other traditional items. They are represented with a powerful beak. The upper half of the beak typically ends in a downward turn. They have large talons and piercing eyes. Also typical for Northwest coast art are the U-form shapes on top of the eagle’s head. Eagles are often depicted with a salmon in their talons; one of their favourite foods.

Please see the limited edition print Highest Level by Margaret August.

What is your return policy?

You can feel 100% confident about your purchase from Cedar Hill Long House Native Art Prints. That is why we offer a 14-day-no-hassle, return policy.

If for any reason you are not satisfied with your purchase, simply let us know that you wish to return the item(s) you bought. You will be given a 100% refund for the purchase amount, excluding any shipping fees.

Refunds will be processed within 2 business days of receiving the returned item.

Click here to see our entire inventory of Indigenous art prints.

What is a printer’s proof?

A printer’s proof (PP) is a print set aside from an edition for the printer’s use. PP’s are notated with the letters PP and a number. The total number of PP’s produced is up to the artist, but it is usually just one or two.

Due to their very low numbers, if a PP is made available for sale, it will typically sell at a higher price than the regular edition.

Please see our Susan Point and Roy Henry Vickers printer’s proofs.

What is an artist’s proof?

An artist’s proof (AP) is a print set aside from an edition for the artist’s use. AP’s are notated with the letters AP and a number. The total number of AP’s produced is up to the artist, but it is usually a percentage of the size of the edition run.

Due to their low numbers, if an AP is made available for sale, it will typically sell at a higher price than the regular edition.

Click here to see our entire inventory of Indigenous art prints.

Why are limited edition prints more expensive than other prints?

The price of limited edition prints is a function of the limited supply of the product, and its quality. Typically, smaller editions will be more expensive. The number of colours used (in screen printing) and the popularity of the artist will also determine the value.

Click here to see our entire inventory of limited edition Northwest coast art prints.

Will the value of a limited edition print increase like other collector’s items?

By their nature of being limited in number, demand for certain limited edition prints can be greater than the total number of prints produced for the edition. Once the publisher has sold out of the edition, the prints are considered to be on the secondary market. At this point a print often sells above issue price, depending on demand.

Click here to see our entire inventory of limited edition Native art prints.

What is a limited edition serigraph?

A limited edition serigraph, or silk screen print, is a print from an edition which is limited to a one-time printing of a certain number of pieces. The artist typically signs and numbers each print.

Silk screening, which was introduced in its modern form around 1907, is also known as serigraph printing. During the process, a stencil of an image is placed on a taut screen with paper underneath. Ink is then spread on top and forced through the screen onto the paper with a squeegee.

Unlike photo-offset, silkscreens (serigraphs) allow the artist to vary the colours and patterns while printing. A different screen is used for each colour in the print, and this results in a print with great colour density and many qualities of the original piece in terms of colour saturation. This also means that only one colour can be printed at a time, making the screen printing process slower than other methods of printing. However, in the fine art world, screenprints hold their high value due to their lightfast, rich, opaque colours, and their hand-produced appeal.

Artists such as Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein became famous for their vibrant, handcrafted serigraphs.

At Cedar Hill Long House Native Art Prints, all of our prints are limited edition silkscreen prints or serigraphs. Please visit our online gallery.

Welcome To Our Northwest Coast Native Art Gallery

Large Selection Of Limited Edition Native Art Prints

As a publisher of limited edition serigraphs we are the original source for high quality prints. We have an extensive selection and offer one of the most affordable ways to own authentic Indigenous art of the Northwest coast.

Dealer inquiries are always welcome. Retailers and museums click here to contact us.